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Author Topic: Precedent-setting support problem in Washington state  (Read 2937 times)

meantime

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Precedent-setting support problem in Washington state
« on: Jun 14, 2011, 10:52:04 AM »
I'm facing a very complicated child support payment problem in Washington state.  I've interviewed several attorneys and so far none of them has any guidance as this is the first time they've heard of this problem.

Washington has a program called Running Start that allows high school students to attend community college part-time and receive both high school and college credit for the hours.  It's a really great program.  My eldest son (lives with mom) will be starting this program in the fall, right about the time he turns 18.  However, he is somehow doing this differently in that he is registered full-time at Seattle City College and will be receiving factional high school credit.  From what I understand of the way this has been arranged, he won't technically graduate high school until he finishes his AA two years from now.

The other part of this is that in Washington child support is paid until the child is 18, or until they graduate high school, whichever comes *last*.  So this would seem to be a loophole to allow an additional year+ of child support.

Like I said, I haven't found an attorney yet who has even the smallest bit of advice on this one.  This may actually be the first time it's been an issue in Washington.

If anyone has any suggestions of places to look, thing to read, or persons to consult with, I would greatly appreciate.

Thank.


Kitty C.

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Re: Precedent-setting support problem in Washington state
« Reply #1 on: Jun 14, 2011, 01:56:29 PM »
'From what I understand of the way this has been arranged, he won't technically graduate high school until he finishes his AA two years from now.'
 
Where did this information come from?  If it came from the ex, I'd be contacting the college to verify.  If it came directly from the college, you might also want to contact the HS to verify.  Talk to the HS guidance counselor....if your son goes through a graduation ceremony next spring and is given anything that resembles a diploma, I'd say that's graduating.
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bloom6372

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Re: Precedent-setting support problem in Washington state
« Reply #2 on: Jun 14, 2011, 08:56:09 PM »
I would second calling to verify. Call the program, call the college, and call the HS to get verification. If you have the time, I'd actually write to them so that you can get a response in writing.

I went to community college prior to moving onto a bigger university. In order to register, I had to have a diploma (or GED). I understand the program allows for HS students to register part-time and get credits for HS and college. However, I've never heard of a high-schooler being allowed to be enrolled full time in college and getting a degree prior to graduating.

What grade is your son in? Read this: http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=392-169-055
It states:
Running start program enrollment under this chapter is limited as follows (and as may be further limited for academic reasons under WAC 392-169-057):

   (1) An eligible student who enrolls in grade eleven may enroll in an institution of higher education while in the eleventh grade for no more than the course work equivalent to one academic year of enrollment as an annual average full-time equivalent running start student (i.e., three college or university quarters as a full-time equivalent college or university student, or two semesters as a full-time equivalent college or university student or nine months as a full-time equivalent technical college student).

   (2) An eligible student who enrolls in grade twelve may enroll in an institution of higher education while in the twelfth grade for no more than the course work equivalent to one academic year of enrollment as an annual average full-time equivalent running start student (i.e., three college or university quarters as a full-time equivalent community college or university student, or two semesters as a full-time equivalent college or university student and nine months as a full-time technical college student).

   (3) Enrollment in an institution of higher education is limited to the fall, winter and spring quarters, and the fall and spring semesters.

  (4) As a general rule a student's eligibility for running start program enrollment terminates at the end of the student's twelfth grade regular academic year, notwithstanding the student's failure to have enrolled in an institution of higher education to the full extent permitted by subsections (1) and (2) of this section: Provided, That a student who has failed to meet high school graduation requirements as of the end of the student's twelfth grade regular academic year (September-June) due to the student's absence, the student's failure of one or more courses, or another similar reason may continue running start program enrollment for the sole and exclusive purpose of completing the particular course or courses required to meet high school graduation requirements, subject to the enrollment limitation established by subsection (2) of this section.

Your son would be considered "graduated" after his 12th grade year. The program only lasts until requirements have been met for graduation. If he continues on to get his AA after 12th grade, you are not responsible for support unless otherwise stated in your CO or state law. He has to be a junior or senior to be eligible for the program. Once he's out of high school, he's just in college, not in the program.

 

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