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Author Topic: psychological records  (Read 3181 times)

longship

  • Guest
psychological records
« on: Dec 01, 2003, 10:59:06 AM »
OK,

First of all, I'm tired of this new board being empty so I'm going to post something!

We just learned this weekend that SS9 has been seeing some kind of mental health professional.  DH asked BM about it Sunday and she got hysterical ... of course, blaming DH for it (the boy is having tornado dreams because when DH and BM first moved to Ohio, a tornado came close to hitting the area they lived in ... that was 4 years ago).  

Even though she has sole custody and it doesn't specifically say that she should tell DH about this kind of thing, shouldn't she tell DH about it?  It does say specifically in the decree that he is to have access to all medical records, including psychological records.  If DH doesn't know that his son is being seen by a psychologist (or whatever) and who that person is, how can he have access?

Also, we think this psychologist might be her BIL who is not really a psychologist, but a brain surgeon who took a few psychology classes during his brain studies.  Any advice on what we can do about that?

We are in the middle of a custody battle with BM now (we just want joint decision making rights and more time in the summer and winter holidays ... BM is refusing both).  Mediation failed (of course).  DH gave in to several of her demands (me not coming with him to exchange the kids and me not talking to the kids on the phone among them) but she refused to give in on anything.  I hope the mediator has a way to at least let the judge know who was willing to cooperate and who was not.  

We are Greene county.

Thanks.


purrrfectgirl

  • Guest
RE: psychological records
« Reply #1 on: Dec 01, 2003, 12:22:31 PM »
If you are in the middle of a court hearing anyway, ask her for the name of the psychologist.  She is leagally required to tell you if you ask.  And if she refuses, then file a motion - you're in court anyway.  If you ask while she's on the stand she wouldn't want to look bad in front of the judge and will probably tell you.  Then you can write the psychologist for the info.  If the psychologist refuses to get you the information then there are professional associations you can report him to.  We had to resort to threats of reporting my skids shrink before he would cough up the info!  Best of luck to you.

NoNicky

  • Guest
RE: psychological records
« Reply #2 on: Dec 03, 2003, 09:02:10 PM »
As you have already been told ask for the name of the psychologist.  If you want then e-mail me and I'll give you a copy of a very effective letter we have been sending to dss's doctors, psychologists and psychiatrists.  We also send them a copy of Ohio law when we send them the letter.  It states that they may not withhold the information contained in the records from the NCP; that all information shared with the CP must also be shared with the NCP if they request it as long as there is no order in place barring the NCP from contact with the child.  The very absence of one in their possession proves that one does not exist.  

It takes a lot of letter writing but you can get the information.  Another way to get it is to write to any pediatrician or other medical doctor you are aware you.  In your letter to them state that you want them to disclose to you the names and address's of any other medical or mental health professional seeing your child that they are aware of.  That's how we found out who some of the doctor's were because bm and her parents were not willing to provide us with that info despite a court order telling them to do so.

Best of Luck

For God has not given a spirit of fear; but of power and of love and of a sound mind.  1 Peter 1:6

 

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