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Author Topic: Looking for advice to show evidence of alienation  (Read 2146 times)

undeadman138

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Looking for advice to show evidence of alienation
« on: Jun 07, 2012, 09:47:14 PM »
Greetings. I am new to this site and actually just stumbled across it while searching the web for articles about parental alienation. I am entering my third round of hearings for my custody situation. This time we are going back for all of the violations to our current court order by the other parent, but I feel it should lead to me requesting modification. While reading the post about NOT proving alienation, I realized just how much my children fit the description of alienation-affected children. The similarities were spot on. This leads to my question, can anyone else who has perhaps been through this or just happens to have extensive knowledge on the situation recommend what kinds of things need to be shown in court and exactly HOW to show them in a way that goes beyond finger pointing and accusations? I can say till I'm blue in the face that my kids are constantly subjected to their other parent berating me and blaming me for the things they are not providing for them, but I know how far that's going to get me. I'm just looking for suggestions for more concrete, tangible forms of evidence to produce to show that there is alienation happening without blatantly accusing the other parent. At this point visitation has already been withheld twice and possibly a third time coming up, but how do I show the effects it is having on my children? What do I need to file in order to get the judge to recognize it for himself? Any suggestions at all would be appreciated. Thank you.


MixedBag

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Re: Looking for advice to show evidence of alienation
« Reply #1 on: Jun 08, 2012, 05:27:00 AM »
Divorce Poison -- something you can find at Amazon.com or on Ebay.  The best $$$'s I've every spent when dealing with this subject.
 
In court, you have to focus on the missed time that it causes the children to lose with you.
 
At home.... a lot of "well, what do you think?" works, because when they answer and parrot the other parent, you ask "where do you see that here?" and stuff and it keeps the conversation flowing and gets them thinking independently of the other parent.

DadsCrushed

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Re: Looking for advice to show evidence of alienation
« Reply #2 on: Jun 08, 2012, 02:33:54 PM »
I believe most states do NOT identify PAS as admissible. I know that Maryland does not. You can not merely state the ex bad mouths you to the children as changed circumstances for a motion for modification. However, sounds like you have some contempt hearings. I do not know the nature and/or scope of these hearings but denial of visitation is not in the children's best interest. I do know that the appellate court in NY did grant a father full custody due to the mother's incessant BS with denials of visitation.
 
Social Services will be of little help, as well. They look at quanitifying mental / emotional abuse. If the benchmark does not demonstrate a drop in the children's grades, bedwetting, or the like they won't look at PAS via emotional abuse.
 
My children repeated some vile garbage from their mother. Is this abuse . . . absolutely but the system really does not see it as so.
 
Play the contempts, pull their school grades, take them to one of your doctors and then get ready for  a modification.

 

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